10knotes:


“I’m in love with people’s hands and the way they clench their fists and the way their fingertips lightly press down onto piano keys or thighs. Calloused fingers or dainty fingers. Hands writing poems or memos or parking tickets. Hands writing futures. To me, every crease on the palm is a love line.” — Mesogeios

10knotes:

“I’m in love with people’s hands and the way they clench their fists and the way their fingertips lightly press down onto piano keys or thighs. Calloused fingers or dainty fingers. Hands writing poems or memos or parking tickets. Hands writing futures. To me, every crease on the palm is a love line.” — Mesogeios

(via ox-letsrunawaytoparis-xo)

“I just want someone who won’t get annoyed when I text them six times or in all caps. Someone I can go on long drives with and can sing along to the radio with. Someone I can eat pizza with at 2am and kiss at 6pm. Someone who chooses me everyday and never thinks twice about it.”
policymic:


America’s first Muslim fraternity may change your idea of fraternities … and Muslims

When you think of fraternities, the first things that usually come to mind are house parties and keg stands, not kufis and prayer rugs. But the brothers of Alpha Lambda Mu — or Alif Laam Meem, as they are also known — are out to change people’s ideas of fraternities, as well as their perceptions of young American Muslims.
ALM, the first Muslim fraternity in the U.S., was founded last year by Ali Mahmoud, a junior at the University of Texas, Dallas. Since then, chapters have opened at Cornell University and University of California, San Diego, and there are plans to expand this fall at San Diego State and the University of Florida.
Read more | Follow policymic

policymic:


America’s first Muslim fraternity may change your idea of fraternities … and Muslims

When you think of fraternities, the first things that usually come to mind are house parties and keg stands, not kufis and prayer rugs. But the brothers of Alpha Lambda Mu — or Alif Laam Meem, as they are also known — are out to change people’s ideas of fraternities, as well as their perceptions of young American Muslims.
ALM, the first Muslim fraternity in the U.S., was founded last year by Ali Mahmoud, a junior at the University of Texas, Dallas. Since then, chapters have opened at Cornell University and University of California, San Diego, and there are plans to expand this fall at San Diego State and the University of Florida.
Read more | Follow policymic

policymic:


America’s first Muslim fraternity may change your idea of fraternities … and Muslims

When you think of fraternities, the first things that usually come to mind are house parties and keg stands, not kufis and prayer rugs. But the brothers of Alpha Lambda Mu — or Alif Laam Meem, as they are also known — are out to change people’s ideas of fraternities, as well as their perceptions of young American Muslims.
ALM, the first Muslim fraternity in the U.S., was founded last year by Ali Mahmoud, a junior at the University of Texas, Dallas. Since then, chapters have opened at Cornell University and University of California, San Diego, and there are plans to expand this fall at San Diego State and the University of Florida.
Read more | Follow policymic

policymic:

America’s first Muslim fraternity may change your idea of fraternities … and Muslims

When you think of fraternities, the first things that usually come to mind are house parties and keg stands, not kufis and prayer rugs. But the brothers of Alpha Lambda Mu — or Alif Laam Meem, as they are also known — are out to change people’s ideas of fraternities, as well as their perceptions of young American Muslims.

ALM, the first Muslim fraternity in the U.S., was founded last year by Ali Mahmoud, a junior at the University of Texas, Dallas. Since then, chapters have opened at Cornell University and University of California, San Diego, and there are plans to expand this fall at San Diego State and the University of Florida.

Read moreFollow policymic

(via aly-gator)

siccity:

no one understands my love for Wednesday Addams
siccity:

no one understands my love for Wednesday Addams
siccity:

no one understands my love for Wednesday Addams
siccity:

no one understands my love for Wednesday Addams
siccity:

no one understands my love for Wednesday Addams
siccity:

no one understands my love for Wednesday Addams
siccity:

no one understands my love for Wednesday Addams
parmesan:

dayzies-s:

tan-fit-healthy:

letsdeadlyfart:

bluedreamsx:

slaveoftheflesh:

xsorrowxlightx:

trumpetnista:

rarely-pure-never-simple:

thecornercoffeeshoppe:

hickshannary:

small-and-misunderstood:

Saw this somewhere else and felt the need to post it cause no one else ever really tells you this stuff

My mom never really noticed. She noticed when she was breast feeding my little brother and blood started coming out instead of milk. 

My mom said she felt and saw a little lump in the shower. She was lucky enough she found it at stage 2

My mom had a mammogram. The radiologist thought the spots were just regular calcium deposits. 
Turns out it was triple negative breast cancer that had spread to her lymph nods. Mastectomy, radiation and chemo saved her life.
This could SAVE a life.
dont be embarrassed to reblog, this post could be life saving

Signal BOOST and pass it on. I had a breast cancer scare before (luckily it was just scar tissue…) and information like this kept me calm and collected at the doc’s. 

As a cancer patient myself, who found my own cancer through a supposed LARPing injury last year, i know how scary it is and how important it is to catch it early. Please spread this around!

listen to ur boobs

its all in the boobs

hoW MANY TIMES AM I GOING TO REBLOG THIS ! SORRY FOLLOWERS , #sorrynotsorry 

Always reblog! 

REBLOG,THIS COULD SAVE SOMEBODY!!! DONT BE EMBARRASSED!!!
B

important

parmesan:

dayzies-s:

tan-fit-healthy:

letsdeadlyfart:

bluedreamsx:

slaveoftheflesh:

xsorrowxlightx:

trumpetnista:

rarely-pure-never-simple:

thecornercoffeeshoppe:

hickshannary:

small-and-misunderstood:

Saw this somewhere else and felt the need to post it cause no one else ever really tells you this stuff

My mom never really noticed. She noticed when she was breast feeding my little brother and blood started coming out instead of milk. 

My mom said she felt and saw a little lump in the shower. She was lucky enough she found it at stage 2

My mom had a mammogram. The radiologist thought the spots were just regular calcium deposits. 

Turns out it was triple negative breast cancer that had spread to her lymph nods. Mastectomy, radiation and chemo saved her life.

This could SAVE a life.

dont be embarrassed to reblog, this post could be life saving

Signal BOOST and pass it on. I had a breast cancer scare before (luckily it was just scar tissue…) and information like this kept me calm and collected at the doc’s.

As a cancer patient myself, who found my own cancer through a supposed LARPing injury last year, i know how scary it is and how important it is to catch it early. Please spread this around!

listen to ur boobs

its all in the boobs

hoW MANY TIMES AM I GOING TO REBLOG THIS ! SORRY FOLLOWERS , #sorrynotsorry

Always reblog! 

REBLOG,THIS COULD SAVE SOMEBODY!!! DONT BE EMBARRASSED!!!

B

important

“I crave your mouth, your voice, your hair,
Silent and starving, I prowl through the streets
Bread does not nourish me, dawn disrupts me, all day
I hunt for the liquid measure of your steps.”
Pablo Neruda, “Love Sonnet XI” (via lifeinpoetry)
“I am constantly perplexed and annoyed by the persistent bias against female bosses. Even many feminist women will unleash a torrent of misogynist tropes at the mere mention of female colleagues: Women are terrible bosses; female colleagues are the worst; women are back-stabbing, catty, two-faced, incompetent, etc.

This has not been my experience. I have had multiple female bosses, and I have loved working for all of them.

My first job out of college started as a temporary position at a reception desk. When I started, the president (a man) and vice-president (a woman) of the firm were traveling out of the office for a few days. I was told they’d be calling in for messages, and I was warned—repeatedly—that the vice-president, Helene, was a dragon lady, a bitch, a holy terror. The nicest way it was put to me is that she was “difficult.” I was admonished to be very careful about how I gave her messages to her, because she would destroy me if I made a mistake.

I made sure to provide her messages in precisely the way I’d been instructed, and she was perfectly polite to me over the phone. But, by the time she was due back in the office, I’d been warned about her so many times, in so many blunt and nasty ways, that I was, frankly, terrified of her.

Helene returned to the office one morning, an hour late as I would discover was her habit. She was a beautiful, fashionable, confident woman. She introduced herself brusquely, but welcomed me to the team. I was intimidated by the sheer force of her presence, but she seemed nice enough. I waited for the other shoe to drop, for the dragon lady to reveal herself.

That day never came.

Within a couple of months, my position had been made permanent, and I was quickly promoted to an assistant position in Helene’s department. Helene was tough. She had high expectations of me. But she was also an incredibly generous mentor. I was eager to learn, and she was keen to teach me. She wanted things done a certain way, but she was open to suggestions and encouraged me to challenge her. And if I ever came up with a better way to do something, she was grateful for the idea and let me know she was proud of me. She never took credit for my ideas; to the contrary, she championed me.

By the time I left, I was the director of her department, and I had my own office overlooking Lake Michigan. From reception to an executive office in five years. And it was in no small part because of Helene’s eminent willingness to teach, support, and empower me.

The thing is, Helene could indeed be “difficult.” But not with me. She was “difficult” with the male executives who treated her like shit, with the male staff who undermined her authority. She was “difficult” with people who treated her, the only female executive at the firm, fundamentally differently than they treated the men.

Funny that I developed a reputation for being “difficult,” too.

This has been my experience working for and with “difficult” women. I’m sure there are shitty female bosses in the world; of course there are. But lots of what supposedly constitutes a “difficult” female boss, or colleague, is frequently a reflection of dynamics to which she’s reacting.

Dynamics like the one in which people reject female bosses, instead of rejecting workplace misogyny.”
Melissa McEwan, Who’s the Boss? (via dee-lirious)

(via aly-gator)